Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "the ed show". we are broadcasting from denver. and msnbc is hosting a presidential debate eve watch party here in denver tomorrow night. come out and join us at the governor's park tavern at 4:00 local time here in denver. after the show, i'll leave the studio and visit with you. we're looking for it. we'll hear your thoughts on the upcoming debate on wednesday night and the upcoming election. that goes for all our listeners on colorado progressive talk. we look forward to seeing you tomorrow night at the governor's park tavern right after the show. >>> tonight in our survey, i asked you, do you trust mitt romney's and paul ryan's math? 3% of you said yes. 97% of you said no. >>> coming up, the man who just finished debating eric cantor, wayne paul powell joins me next. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your busines
. proposals in tv ads and on the stump like a million new manufacturing jobs, 100,000 new math and science teachers. feel mores a operational than an actual detailed plan. given the fact there's hunger for change, what change can the incumbent promise? the president has to come up with a good enough explanation of how reelecting him would break the partisan fever in washington. what does romney have to deal with? he hasn't differentiated from george bush's. and his plans lack specifics. in a one-on-one debate, candidates have a lot of control over how aggressive they are. both romney and the president are inexperienced in a one-on-one debate format. few details on the format. the president and romney will be at podiums, standing, not sitting, and there will be no basic time limits on their answers. it's not 90 seconds, buzzer, things like that. it's up to the discretion of the moderator, jim leierer. that's going to be up to him. but there's supposed to be a lot of leeway here over how long the conversations go. the debate is on domestic policy. 90 minutes is supposed to be devoted to the
in science or medicine and will now be relegated to quackery. >>> and everybody's talking about arnold schwarzenegger's new book and how he had an affair with more than just the housekeeper. he chieted with actress bridget nielsen while living with maria shriver. >> you don't feel bad about it, you just write it. >> actually, i did feel bad about it. but all my various things were just mistakes. you know, my failure, my screwups. >> was that the only affair? >> no. i had others. but, you know, that's something that's obviously between marie and me. >> and we will hear from him in our next half hour. speaking of arnold, if you read only one thing this morning, i highly recommend janet maslin's review of his book. an autobiography of someone as mast master conniver. one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day w
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
proposals. i'm asking -- >> 100,000 new math and science teachers. we need that. >> that's a goal, right? >> educating training 2 million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and i believe they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> the verdict will be rendered november 6. megyn: joining me now mark hannah, former aid to john kerry and barack obama. kevin, your chots on that exchange? >> that was a revealing look inside the best talking points that president obama has by his top spokesperson on the campaign frame beside himself. if you can't get more prekay tough than education, green energy, research and development, and that's the solutions? those are the pin points for solutions you are offering for an election that's going to be decided on an economy and job
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
with the right skills here in the united states. so i need you to help me recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers, improve early childhood education, give two million workers the chance to learn skills the community college that will lead directly to a job. help us work with colleges and universities like this one to cut the growth of tuition costs so that you guys aren't overburdened with debt when you graduate. that's a goal we can meet. we can choose that future for america. we're going to have to do something about the deficit. but we've got to do it in a smart way. i said i'd cut the deficit by $4 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher taxes on the wealthiest of americans. i've already worked with republicans to cut a trillion dollars in spending. i'm willing to do more. i want to reform the tax code so it's simple and fair. but i'm also going to ask the wealthiest among us to pay a higher tax on incomes over $250,000. the same rate we had when bill clinton was president created 23 million new jobs, went from deficit to surplus. and look, the whole economy does well when
educational system with new math and science teachers. a whole host of things that we can continue to do to strengthen our economy, put the middle class back to work, and give them a real sense of security. >> the pew research center came out with a poll. they asked the question, who will do a better job in wednesday's debate? this is registered voters. look at this, robert, 51% thought the president would do a better job. romney, 29%. i assume this puts a lot of pressure on the president. he's really got to deliver, doesn't he? >> reporter: well, look, you know, i think the president certainly has come on to the scene, and you heard him give big speeches, but this is a very different format. you know, the president hasn't done this in four years, but, look, and i think the president looks at this not as a boxing match, or as you've heard the romney campaign talk about they're practicing zingers and, you know, sharp lines. i think what the president, again, wants too is have a direct conversation with the american people. talk to them about where they are and where we need to go. and i t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)